Love without Bread

The Parables were “Kingdom Messages,” but also had moral applications for our livelihood. The enemy sowed weeds among the wheat while “everyone was sleeping” (Mt. 13:25). The five foolish virgins went to sleep unprepared and missed their own wedding (Mt. 25:1-13). The disciples slept during the crucial time when their Lord was betrayed and arrested (Mt. 26:36-46). Twice the guards slept at the secret passage to Sardis when the Persians and later the Syrians surprised the Lydians (W.B. pp. 68-70). History has many Trojan Horses disturbing man’s slumbers and sleep.

Love without Bread

Noah, we are told was a farmer or man of the soil. He was the first to give up bread making and turned to planting a vineyard and the making of wine. He, like so many that followed, allowed wine to take over his life. He got drunk and exposed himself and then blamed his grandson Canaan for his indecency. He cursed his grandson and the curse became a prophetic reality for all drunks. Drunks lose their minds and self-control and do regrettable and irresponsible things. It was because of Noah’s sin that the Canaanites, descendants of Ham, were cursed and dispossessed by their cousins, the Shemites or Semites (Gen. 9:18-29).

Love without Bread

Man has found time for everything, except enough time for the earth to recover from being exploited and abused. The Preacher came to the following conclusion, “For everything there is a season, and a time for every matter under heaven: a time to be born and a time to die; a time to plant, and a time to cut down (harvest); a time to hurt, and a time to heal; a time to break down, and a time to build up;’ ‘It is God’s gift that every men should eat and drink and be pleased in what he does’”(Ecc. 3:1-3,13). In order to live, man has to spend time with the earth (Gen. 1:28-30).

Love without Bread

The world will never satisfy the poor or end poverty. It is not because there is not enough bread, but because there are people that prefer to burden others. A vagrant came to the door of a widow begging for a meal. She offered to feed him if he would help her saw off a few pieces of wood at the woodpile. He replied, “You will see me see it, but you won’t see me saw it.” Judas the man that sold out his teacher for thirty pieces of silver to feed the poor was told, “The poor you will always have with you, and you can help them any time you want. Me, however, you will not always have” (Mk. 14:7). My wife and I have gone through a time in our youth when we lived on nothing and survived while people that lost nothing and had everything and did not survive.