Meet the Makarioi (Dispensers of Grace)

Blessed (makarios) is that servant whom his Lord finds at work when he returns” (Mt. 24:46). Man is in search of self-assertion. He measures his self-worth by the number of men he commands or the responsibility he delegates. It was at an early age that I aspired to be a cub leader. And when I was set over two troops, I felt rather important. However, I felt not as important as my neighbor who was leader over all the cub groups in the district. In order to acquire more skills to command others, I even was sent away to a training camp. That was and still is the way the world looks on those who serve and those who are being served.

Meet the Makarioi (Dispensers of Grace)

How could one be blessed who followed a man who had no place to lay his head, and that no one regarded that any one good could come where he came from? What did Jesus show these men that made them stay with him who had little to offer here on earth, but suffering, sorrow and even death? God gives eyes and ears to those who are willing to sort what is right from what is wrong. Man’s eyes and ears are the doors to their mind. It is the mind that controls these receptacles. Like a door, the mind can open or close a person’s eyes. It is unfortunately that the mind does not always do its job of filtering the information. Jesus made this curious statement: “If you were blind, you would have no sin; now that you say ‘we see’ your sin remains” (Jn. 9:41). “The eye is the lamp of a person’s body. So, if your eye is sound, your whole body will be full of light; but if your eye is not sound, your whole body will be full of darkness. If then the light in you is darkness, how great is that darkness” (Mt. 6:22-23). One of the saddest commentaries on human receptivity comes from the Prologue of the “Gospel of John.” The author stated, “Light into the darkness shines, and the darkness does not receive it.” Jesus was that light and his own people rejected His message. They preferred to live in darkness; rather, than open their minds or hearts to the Good News Jesus was offering. It was when the public had refused His message that Jesus turned to his disciples and made this statement, “Blessed (makarioi) are the eyes that see what you see. For I tell you many prophets and kings wanted to see what you see and did not, and to hear what you hear and did not” (Lk. 10:23-24).